Tag Archives: vmware

howto configure proxy info in Virtual Center Update Manager 2.5

1) user proxy auhtentication can be set via the command line util VUM-proxyauthcfg,exe

2) proxy settings can be set in vci-integrity.xml

both can be found in the update manager install dir

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VMware Server.msi is not permitted due to an error in software restriction policy processing. The object cannot be trusted.

You try to install a Vmware Server 2, and get an error claiming that software restriction policies prohibit this installation.

In the eventvwr (application log) you find an entry like this :

The installation of C:\DOCUME~1\ADMINI~1\LOCALS~1\Temp\1\{AF08C71F-F822-4416-87A9-2BBF5A8A5F12}~setup\VMware Server.msi is not permitted due to an error in software restriction policy processing. The object cannot be trusted.

Solution : KB9253326

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/925336

How to configure VMWARE networking from the Service console command line.

How to configure VMWARE networking from the command line.

see vmware KB 1000258
1.
Ensure the network adapter you want to use is currently connected

[root@server root]#  esxcfg-nics –l
Name    PCI      Driver      Link Speed    Duplex Description
vmnic0  06:00.00 tg3         Up   1000Mbps Full   Broadcom Corporation NetXtreme BCM5721 Gigabit Ethernet
vmnic1  07:00.00 tg3         Up   1000Mbps Full   Broadcom Corporation NetXtreme BCM5721 Gigabit Ethernet

Up indicates that the network adapter is available and functioning.

2.
List the current virtual switches

[root@server root]# esxcfg-vswitch –l
Switch Name    Num Ports   Used Ports  Configured Ports  Uplinks
vSwitch0       32          3           32                vmnic0

PortGroup Name      Internal ID    VLAN ID  Used Ports  Uplinks
VM Network          portgroup2     0        0           vmnic0

In the above example, there exists a virtual machine network named “VM Network” and no Service Console portgroup. For illustration, we will create a new virtual switch and place the service console portgroup on it.

3.
Create a new virtual switch:

[root@server root]# esxcfg-vswitch –a vSwitch1

4.
Create the Service Console portgroup on this new virtual switch:

[root@server root]# esxcfg-vswitch –A “Service Console” vSwitch1

Because there is a space in the name we chose (Service Console), we must enclose it in quotation marks.

5.
Uplink vmnic1 to the new virtual switch:

[root@server root]# esxcfg-vswitch –L vmnic1 vSwitch1

6.
If you need to assign a VLAN, use the command:

[root@server root]# esxcfg-vswitch -v <VLAN> -p “Service Console” vSwitch0

where <VLANID> is the VLAN number. A zero here specifies no VLAN.

7.
Verify the new virtual switch configuration:

[root@server root]# esxcfg-vswitch –l

Switch Name    Num Ports   Used Ports  Configured Ports  Uplinks
vSwitch0       32          3           32                vmnic0

PortGroup Name      Internal ID    VLAN ID  Used Ports  Uplinks
Service Console     portgroup5     0        1           vmnic0

Switch Name    Num Ports   Used Ports  Configured Ports  Uplinks
vSwitch1       64          1           64                vmnic1

PortGroup Name      Internal ID    VLAN ID  Used Ports  Uplinks
Service Console     portgroup14    0        1           vmnic1

8.
Create the vswif (Service Console) interface. For example:

[root@server root]# esxcfg-vswif –a vswif0 –i 192.168.1.10 –n 255.255.255.0 –p “Service Console”
[‘Vnic’ warning] Generated New Mac address, 00:50:yy:yy:yy:yy for vswif0

Nothing to flush.

9.
Verify the configuration:

[root@esx]# esxcfg-vswif –l
Name     Port Group          IP Address    Netmask          Broadcast      Enabled   DHCP
vswif0   Service Console     192.168.1.10  255.255.255.0    192.168.1.255  true      false

10.
Verify the networking configuration on the ESX Server host. See Verifying ESX Server host networking configuration on the service console (1003796) .

power on virtual machine hangs at 0%

What if a task submitted from the Virtual infrastructure client hangs ?  Reboot the vmware management service with this command :

service mgmt-vmware restart

howto resize a disk in Vmware ESX

update : this is an outdated article.  You really should consider upgrading to the latest versions of vsphere with new features such as storage vmotion, thin provisioning, and soon storage drs.

There are multiple ways to resize or enlarge a disk in Vmware ESX.

One way would be by using the vmware converter.  Easy!  This enlarges your disk both on the ESX as on Windows.

If you’re using ESX 3.5, you can resize the disk using the VI client, while the VM is online!  After this, you still have to resize the disk in Windows.  (or *nix.)

If you’re using a previous version of ESX, you can resize the disk with this command.

  • vmkfstools –X 20000M /vmfs/volumes/volumename/machinename/xxx.vmdk
    where 20000M is the new size, not the amount you’re adding!

After this you still have to resize the volume by using a disk management / partition utility.  You could also boot with Bartpe and use diskpart, or add the disk to another VM, and run diskpart from there.

  • diskpart
  • list volume
  • select volume X (x being the volume)
  • extend

However you cannot resize the active boot volume.  In this case, boot with a BartPE cd of add the disk to another machine).

Another way is to resize the disk with vmkfstools, as described above, and then resize the disk in windows using extpart (tool from dell).  works on VM’s http://ftp.dell.com/app/ExtPart.exe

Another solution, would be to resize the disk with vmkfstools, and then resize the disk with Gparted.  You can download a bootcd here : http://gparted.sourceforge.net/

Doesn’t matter how you do it, just always take a good backup!!!!

Howto get a list of port groups in VMWARE

I recently added an article on how to change the ipaddress of the service console.

But what if the service console has another name then service console?

you can get a list of all port groups by typing this command :

esxcfg-vswitch -l

enable SSH on ESXi

  • On the ESXi console press alt F1
  • you will see no prompt or whatever, just type unsupported
  • Enter your root password
  • at the prompt type vi /etc/inetd.conf
  • search with pressing / for a line that starts with #ssh
  • remove the #.  This can be done by pressing x when you’re on the character #
  • save the file by typing :wq!
  • restart the server

with thanks to the great post on yellow-bricks.com